Transform the treatment of Parkinson’s disease psychosis

Find out how NUPLAZID® (pimavanserin) can benefit your patients

Meet David, a 72-year-old man, diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease 7 years ago. At times, David believes he sees his deceased wife in the room with him and talks with her in the evenings.

Actor portrayal

CURRENT MEDICATION

  • Carbidopa/levodopa

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Motor function is currently controlled with carbidopa/levodopa

CAREGIVER CONCERN

  • His children are concerned that he constantly talks about his deceased wife
  • He is aware that his wife has died when his children talk about her
When you see a patient like David, start treatment with NUPLAZID.

illustrative example

Meet Susan, a 78-year-old woman, diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease 9 years ago. Susan often sees children playing inside the living room and actively talks to them although no one is there. She also sees insects crawling on the walls throughout her house.

Actor portrayal

CURRENT MEDICATION

  • Carbidopa/levodopa

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Reduction of carbidopa/levodopa made, but led to worsening of motor function

CAREGIVER CONCERN

  • Susan’s daughter is worried as her mother is bringing food into the living room that is left uneaten and attracting bugs, and is concerned this is happening too often
    • When asked about this, Susan responds that the children may be hungry and need food
When you see a patient like Susan, start treatment with NUPLAZID.

illustrative example

Meet John, an 83-year-old man, diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease 12 years ago. John experiences daily hallucinations of his deceased dog throughout the house. He also goes through his wife’s belongings because he believes she is having an affair.

Actor portrayal

CURRENT MEDICATION

  • Carbidopa/levodopa

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Carbidopa/levodopa doses were reduced, and led to worsening motor symptoms
  • An atypical antipsychotic was previously added, but was discontinued
  • Refuses to use the bathroom at night for fear of stepping on the dog
  • At risk of falling as he attempts to take care of the dog

CAREGIVER CONCERN

  • His wife, unable to convince him that the dog isn’t real and that she is not cheating on him, is very frustrated
    • Is sometimes embarrassed to have people over because of his symptoms
    • Is concerned about her ability to take care of John
When you see a patient like John, start treatment with NUPLAZID.

illustrative example

Meet Henry, an 89-year-old man, diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease 12 years ago. For the last several months, Henry has seen water seeping in from under the door, and is afraid that water will fill the entire room and drown him. His behavior worsens at sundown.

Actor portrayal

CURRENT MEDICATION

  • Carbidopa/levodopa for PD, but still experiencing significant gait disturbances, balance, and freezing issues
  • Atypical antipsychotic (low-dose), anticoagulant, MAO-B

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Recently diagnosed with dementia
  • Was just transferred to a long-term care facility because of his inability to take care of himself
  • Unwilling to leave his room, afraid to bathe, unable to use the toilet or groom himself due to hallucinations
  • Prescribed an atypical antipsychotic for hallucinations, but symptoms have not resolved and medication was discontinued
When you see a patient like Henry, start treatment with NUPLAZID.

illustrative example

Meet Ann, a 75-year-old woman, diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease 8 years ago. For the last several months, Ann believes the staff is trying to poison her; at times has refused to eat her meals, and has become combative with nursing staff. Recently, Ann started talking about seeing her dog from childhood.

Actor portrayal

CURRENT MEDICATION

  • Carbidopa/levodopa for PD, Ace inhibitor, NSAID, statin

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Carbidopa/levodopa was adjusted and led to worsening motor symptoms (bradykinesia and difficulty writing)
  • Wandering at night worries nursing staff
  • Prescribed an atypical antipsychotic for delusions and hallucinations, but symptoms remained and medication was titrated to a higher dose
  • Atypical antipsychotic was adjusted according to gradual dose reduction regulations, but symptoms have worsened, and medication was discontinued
When you see a patient like Ann, start treatment with NUPLAZID.

illustrative example

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Important Safety Information for NUPLAZID (pimavanserin) 17-mg Tablets

WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS
Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. NUPLAZID is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis unrelated to the hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson's disease psychosis.

Contraindication: NUPLAZID is contraindicated in patients with a history of hypersensitivity reaction to pimavanserin or any of its components. Reactions have included rash, urticaria, tongue swelling, circumoral edema, and throat tightness.

QT Interval Prolongation: NUPLAZID prolongs the QT interval. The use of NUPLAZID should be avoided in patients with known QT prolongation or in combination with other drugs known to prolong QT interval including Class 1A antiarrhythmics or Class 3 antiarrhythmics, certain antipsychotic medications, and certain antibiotics. NUPLAZID should also be avoided in patients with a history of cardiac arrhythmias, as well as other circumstances that may increase the risk of the occurrence of torsade de pointes and/or sudden death, including symptomatic bradycardia, hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia, and presence of congenital prolongation of the QT interval.

Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (≥2% for NUPLAZID and greater than placebo) were peripheral edema (7% vs 2%), nausea (7% vs 4%), confusional state (6% vs 3%), hallucination (5% vs 3%), constipation (4% vs 3%), and gait disturbance (2% vs <1%).

Drug Interactions: Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (eg, ketoconazole) increase NUPLAZID concentrations. Reduce the NUPLAZID dose by one-half. Strong CYP3A4 inducers may reduce NUPLAZID exposure, monitor for reduced efficacy. Increase in NUPLAZID dosage may be needed.

Renal Impairment: No dosage adjustment for NUPLAZID is needed in patients with mild to moderate renal impairment. Use of NUPLAZID is not recommended in patients with severe renal impairment.

Hepatic Impairment: Use of NUPLAZID is not recommended in patients with hepatic impairment. NUPLAZID has not been evaluated in this patient population.

Pregnancy: Use of NUPLAZID in pregnant women has not been evaluated and should therefore be used in pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the mother and fetus.

Pediatric Use: Safety and efficacy have not been established in pediatric patients.

Dosage and Administration

Recommended dose: 34 mg per day, taken orally as two 17-mg tablets once daily, without titration.

Indication

NUPLAZID is an atypical antipsychotic indicated for the treatment of hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson’s disease psychosis.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact ACADIA Pharmaceuticals Inc. at 1-844-4ACADIA (1-844-422-2342) or FDA at www.fda.gov/medwatch , or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please read the full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING.

This website is intended for use by US residents.

Important Safety Information for NUPLAZID (pimavanserin) 17-mg Tablets

WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS
Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. NUPLAZID is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis unrelated to the hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson's disease psychosis.

Contraindication: NUPLAZID is contraindicated in patients with a history of hypersensitivity reaction to pimavanserin or any of its components. Reactions have included rash, urticaria, tongue swelling, circumoral edema, and throat tightness.

QT Interval Prolongation: NUPLAZID prolongs the QT interval. The use of NUPLAZID should be avoided in patients with known QT prolongation or in combination with other drugs known to prolong QT interval including Class 1A antiarrhythmics or Class 3 antiarrhythmics, certain antipsychotic medications, and certain antibiotics. NUPLAZID should also be avoided in patients with a history of cardiac arrhythmias, as well as other circumstances that may increase the risk of the occurrence of torsade de pointes and/or sudden death, including symptomatic bradycardia, hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia, and presence of congenital prolongation of the QT interval.

Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (≥2% for NUPLAZID and greater than placebo) were peripheral edema (7% vs 2%), nausea (7% vs 4%), confusional state (6% vs 3%), hallucination (5% vs 3%), constipation (4% vs 3%), and gait disturbance (2% vs <1%).

Drug Interactions: Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors (eg, ketoconazole) increase NUPLAZID concentrations. Reduce the NUPLAZID dose by one-half. Strong CYP3A4 inducers may reduce NUPLAZID exposure, monitor for reduced efficacy. Increase in NUPLAZID dosage may be needed.

Renal Impairment: No dosage adjustment for NUPLAZID is needed in patients with mild to moderate renal impairment. Use of NUPLAZID is not recommended in patients with severe renal impairment.

Hepatic Impairment: Use of NUPLAZID is not recommended in patients with hepatic impairment. NUPLAZID has not been evaluated in this patient population.

Pregnancy: Use of NUPLAZID in pregnant women has not been evaluated and should therefore be used in pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the mother and fetus.

Pediatric Use: Safety and efficacy have not been established in pediatric patients.

Dosage and Administration

Recommended dose: 34 mg per day, taken orally as two 17-mg tablets once daily, without titration.

Indication

NUPLAZID is an atypical antipsychotic indicated for the treatment of hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson’s disease psychosis.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact ACADIA Pharmaceuticals Inc. at 1-844-4ACADIA (1-844-422-2342) or FDA at www.fda.gov/medwatch , or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please read the full Prescribing Information including Boxed WARNING.

This website is intended for use by US residents.